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TRAINING MANUAL

THE GOOD FOOD TOOLKIT

food

The Good Food Toolkit Training Manual was first produced in 2009. This is the second edition, revised and updated in 2014.

The first edition was made possible by the generous support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and through the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM).

This second edition of the training manual was supported by the UN World Food Programme Cambodia, including its revision, update, translation, printing and dissemination.

This is the second edition, revised, updated and finalized in late 2014.

The Good Food Toolkit Training Manual may be copied and distributed as required, provided the source is fully acknowledged.

First Published 2009
Reviewed and republished 2014 (Second Edition)
Reviewed 2017

Foreword

Foreword (translation)

The integration of HIV and nutrition activities in the health sector in Cambodia has been identified as a priority area in both the National Nutrition Strategy 2009-2015 and the National Strategic Plan for Comprehensive and Multi-sectoral Response to HIV/AIDS III (2011-2015). This is in keeping with global recognition that optimal nutrition plays a critical role in the health and wellness of all individuals, particularly people living with HIV (PLHIV).

HIV and nutrition are inextricably linked. HIV impacts the nutritional status of PLHIV, including children living with HIV (CLHIV) and orphans and vulnerable children (OVC). HIV compromises a person’s nutritional status by undermining their immune system, as well as their ability to assimilate nutrients. Malnutrition in turn further weakens the immune system increasing vulnerability to opportunistic infection and disease. HIV combined with pre-existing under nutrition makes it difficult for PLHIV to remain healthy and economically productive as well as support and provide for family members, particularly children.

Nutrition support is a critical component of comprehensive prevention, care and treatment for individuals with HIV. The provision of nutrition assessments, education, counselling and support can help to improve a person’s nutritional status, ensure adequate food intake, improve the effectiveness, tolerance and adherence to antiretroviral therapy, and enhance quality of life.

Recognizing the critical role that nutrition plays in the comprehensive care of PLHIV, the Good Food Toolkit has been developed for service providers together with an accompanying manual for trainers. This Toolkit is intended for use by professional staff working in health facilities and non-government organizations, home-based care team members, self-help groups who provide nutrition education and support for adults, children, and communities living and affected by HIV. It will also help facilitate nutritional assessments, counselling, education and support to address nutrition issues faced by PLHIV.

The Ministry of Health endorses this toolkit for training on HIV nutrition as an important tool to build the capacity of counsellors to provide effective nutrition counselling, care and support for PLHIV in Cambodia.

Phnom Penh 04 December 2014

(Signed and sealed)

Professor Eng Huot
Secretary of State
Ministry of Health

Acknowledgments

The second edition of the Good Food Toolkit and Training Manual is a collaborative effort of numerous partners involved in HIV and nutrition work in Cambodia. Its printing marks the culmination of the considerable effort that has gone into updating and broadening this important manual to bring it in line with the latest HIV policies and thinking on HIV and nutrition. Coordination for this process has been led by the National Maternal and Child Health Center (NMCHC) in collaboration with the Core Group on HIV Nutrition, under the leadership of Dr. Prak Sophonneary and Dr. Lan Van Seng of the National Centre for HIV/AIDS, Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Infections (NCHADS). Technical support was provided by the United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) Cambodia, specifically Dessa Shuckerow and Seanglay Din, with support from World Food Programme Regional Bureau for Asia. This update would also not have been possible without the generous funding support from UNAIDS.

The first edition of the Toolkit and Training Manual was published in 2009. The 2014 revision reflects lessons learned from the implementation of the Toolkit, advances in evidence-based literature on HIV nutrition, and changes to HIV policy at national level. The content has also been expanded to include additional populations, including pregnant and lactating women living with HIV, HIV exposed infants, children with HIV (paediatric HIV) and orphans and children made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS.

Members of the Core Group on HIV Nutrition who contributed to the development of this second edition also include: National Nutrition Programme (NNP), Prevention of Mother to Child Transmission (PMTCT) Programme, Cambodian HIV/AIDS Education and Care (CHEC), Khmer HIV/AIDS NGO Alliance (KHANA), Caritas, Catholic Relief Service (CRS), Family Health International (FHI) 360, Clinton Health Access Initiative (CHAI), World Health Organisation (WHO), United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) and the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS).

Particular acknowledgment is also extended to Lia Purnomo, Amanda Justice, Katherine Coote and Charmaine Turton of The Albion Centre in Australia, who provided their technical expertise in the revision of this second edition; and Chamroeun Chim for the photographs, illustrations and design.

Special thanks are also expressed to numerous service providers, home-based care teams, self-help group members, and people living with HIV whose experiences and inputs formed the basis of the development of this second edition. Finally, sincere thanks are again extended to all those previously acknowledged for the development of the first edition of the Good Food Toolkit and Training Manual.

Acronyms and Abbreviations

AIDSAcquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome
AHEADAction for Health and Development
ARTAntiretroviral Therapy
ARVAntiretroviral
BCGBacillus Calmette–Guérin
BFCIBaby Friendly Community Initiative
BDFBuddhism for Development
BMIBody Mass Index
CHAIClinton Health Access Initiative
CHCCommunity Health Cambodia
CHECCambodian HIV/AIDS Education and Care
CRSCatholic Relief Services
DNADeoxyribonucleic Acid
H/AHeight-for-Age
HCHealth Center
HCWHealth Care Worker
HIVHuman Immunodeficiency Virus
HKIHelen Keller International
FANTAFood and Nutrition Technical Assistance
FAOFood and Agriculture Organization
FHI 360360 Family Health International
KHANAKhmer HIV/AIDS NGO Alliance
LBWLow Birth Weight
MoHMinistry of Health
MSGMother Support Group
MUACMid-Upper Arm Circumference
NCHADSNational Center for HIV/AIDS, Dermatology and Sexually Transmitted Infection
NGONon-Governmental Organization
NAANational AIDS Authority
NMCHCNational Maternal and Child Health Center
NNPNational Nutrition Program
OI/ARTOpportunistic Infection/antiretroviral Therapy Clinic
OIOpportunistic Infection
ORSOral Rehydration Solution
OVCOrphans and Children Made Vulnerable by HIV/AIDS
PCPartners in Compassion/Cambodia
PCRPolymerase Chain Reaction
PLHIVPeople Living with HIV
PMTCTPrevention of Mother-to-Child Transmission
SCCSalvation Center Cambodia
SHGSelf-Help Group
SITSave Incapacity Teenager
TOTTraining of Trainers
WAOWestern Area Office
W/AWeight-for-Age
WFPWorld Food Programme
W/HWeight-for-Height
WHOWorld Health Organization

Background to the Good Food Toolkit

It is well recognized that good nutrition will lead to better quality lives for People Living with HIV (PLHIV). As Cambodia is quickly reaching universal access for antiretroviral therapy (ART), nutrition plays an even more important role in assuring longer lives and greater productivity.

In Cambodia a diverse selection of food is available in the communities at a low cost. The challenge is identifying and promoting these foods in the communities where PLHIV live. Nutrition counselling can be an important means of improving eating behaviour, enriching the diet, introducing nutritional management of symptoms of illness and providing additional support to PLHIV and their families.

The Good Food Toolkit originally published in 2009 was designed to aid home based care team members, referred to here as counsellors, to assist PLHIV to identify local foods and to negotiate improved health behaviours. In the second edition in 2013, the Toolkit has been revised with the updated content and expanded to include child and maternal health which can be used to aid home base care team members, health centre, OI/ART clinic or Non-Government Organization (NGO) staff who provide care and support programs for PLHIV.

The Toolkit has three key target groups. The first one is adult PLHIV who are relatively healthy and leading normal lives – it is designed to help these people stay healthy and continue to live well with their families in their communities. The second target group is HIV-positive pregnant and breastfeeding women and the third target group is HIV-exposed infants, children with HIV (paediatric HIV) and orphans and children made vulnerable by HIV/AIDS (OVC). Adults and children who are very sick with advanced AIDS and are bed-ridden are not included in this Toolkit.

The Toolkit is a participatory approach to behaviour change that utilizes small cards with photos of local foods in the community as well as life size photos of rice and soups. The Toolkit lets the client select all the foods that are available and affordable to their family. It also allows the counsellor to negotiate new behaviours with the client – such as adding one meal or snack, increasing proportion sizes of rice and soup, making a more thick-nutrient-dense soup, and adding “enhancers” to local recipes to provide more calories and nutrients through ingredients such as: oil, peanuts, sesame seeds, fermented soy beans and other legumes. The counselling session is completely guided by monitoring forms which focus on health and nutritional status assessment and frequency and quality of meals. In addition, the Toolkit includes positive living cards designed to promote complementary good hygiene, health seeking and caring practices.

Use of the Training Manual

Purpose

This manual provides guidance and tools to conduct training on using the Good Food Toolkit. It is designed for use by trainers and other program and government system staff who are responsible for implementing care and support programs for PLHIV. Training participants should include individuals working at lower level health facilities, at the community level and in the homes of PLHIV. Specifically the manual is designed for home based care team members, counsellors and self-help group members but is not limited to use by them. It can be also used to train health centre, OI/ART clinic or NGO staff. The training aims to improve knowledge and skills on nutritional care and support among those whose activities may include providing general nutrition information, care and support to individuals or groups of PLHIV, their household members and communities.

This training manual is designed to provide counsellors using the Good Food Toolkit the necessary skills and knowledge to run counselling sessions that are tailored to the client’s needs. The training begins with general background information on nutrition and HIV, builds skills in assessing anthropometric data, and then hones in on how to conduct brief nutrition counselling sessions with the Toolkit. Counselling is organized in a five-step approach based on the organization of the monitoring form which provides easy prompts that the counsellor can follow. The training teaches the counsellors how to conduct a brief assessment of the client’s current dietary and health seeking behaviours and to guide the rest of the nutrition counselling based on the results of this assessment. The 26 Positive Living Cards present brightly coloured illustrations that describe and support key messages to stay healthy, manage symptoms of illnesses and prompt care seeking. These job aids are designed for use at specific contact points, based on priorities identified during each individual counselling session.

The training provides many opportunities for the participants to practice these new counselling skills and concludes with a field visit to practice first-hand with actual clients. On a practical note, it is important to remember that the most effective counselling occurs when communication is two way between the counsellor and the client. The act of listening, understanding, teaching and advising is facilitated throughout the Good Food Toolkit. Counsellors are prompted to suggest, discuss, and negotiate with the client appropriate choices to improve dietary and health practices that best fit his or her needs using available resources. The Toolkit and training manual follows these guiding principles allowing for PLHIV clients to experience and shape their way to an enhanced quality of life. Finally, the Good Food Toolkit, is more than just a guide to a healthy eating, it is an education, counselling, problem solving and behaviour change tool that will help counsellors to help PLHIV in addressing and finding practical solutions to the health and dietary challenges that PLHIV face every day. Once the basic use of the Toolkit is mastered, we encourage trainers and counsellors to find additional creative ways to use the Toolkit. The possibilities are endless!

This training manual is designed for implementation throughout Cambodia, however it is impossible to accommodate for all local differences, including in culture, religion, and socio-economic conditions. Other variations may arise according to local health care systems and resources. Availability of resources, in particular food, will also mean differences in the management of nutrition. These differences all impact the type of nutrition care and support provided for PLHIV and OVC. Therefore, it is strongly recommended that this training package is adapted to suit the local situation. The trainers can invite people who already have experience in peer education to participate in the training course and during or after the training course they can provide feedback to the facilitators on where and how the materials could be adapted to suit local needs e.g. using case studies from their local experience.

Important Information for Facilitators

Each Lesson in this Training Manual contains the following information:

  • Preparation for Facilitators – explains the expected duration of the lesson, the materials that will be needed, and the methods that will be used.
  • Steps for Instruction includes an introduction to the Lesson, the learning objectives of the lesson, and step-by-step instructions for how to lead and facilitate participants’ learning.
  • Test questions at the end of each lesson there are key questions to evaluate the participants’ learning. Administer the test to participants at the end of each lesson. The answers are provided in an answer key at the back of the manual.

In addition to the test questions for each lesson, assessment and evaluation of the training will be through Pre/Post-Knowledge Training Test (Annex 1) – to be administered before and after the training to measure changes in participants’ knowledge resulting from the training.

Daily Training Evaluation Form (Annex 2) – to be filled daily by participants. Use this tool to collect participants’ feedback about logistics, facilitator delivery skills and training content, as well as applicable knowledge and skills.

Field Practice Evaluation Forms (Annex 3) – to be completed by participants at the end of the supervised field practice to collect participants’ feedback about logistics, field practice supervision, usefulness of the practice exercise, as well as what participants think they gained as a result of the field practice activity.

Final Training Evaluation (Annex 4) – to be conducted by facilitators at the end of the final day of the training to obtain overall feedback on aspects of the training and gauge participants learning experience using a participatory evaluation approach.

This manual also includes copies of nutrition assessment tools, monitoring forms, texts for the role-plays that you may do during the training.

In the days before the start of the training, facilitators should undertake the following preparation:

  1. Review the “Materials Needed” for each lesson and collect the things they will need: flip chart paper, markers, tape, A4 paper, ball, beans, poster, tape measure, etc.
  2. Print or photocopy an adequate number of copies of daily evaluation forms for participants.
  3. Print or photocopy the certificates that will be given to each participant at the end of the course, get any signatures needed (if any).
  4. Write the objectives of each lesson on a large sheet of flipchart paper before the training, so that this will be ready to display at the start of each lesson.
  5. Read and study the lesson plans carefully so that they understand and are prepared, to lead all of the activities. Write notes to prompt recall of important steps to take during the lesson or messages to highlight.
  6. Prepare the venue – a U-shaped or circular arrangement of chairs allows all participants to see each other, and encourages discussion. Try to avoid arrangements of participants in rows facing the same direction.
  7. Think about how you will provide meals, drinks, and snacks to participants.
  8. Prepare any administrative matters (travel allowances, per diem, attendance sheets, etc.) if applicable.
  9. Organize the logistics of the “Supervised Field Practice” that will be done on the last day of the training: identify which villages and PLHIV to visit; and inform the communities about the timing and purpose of the visit. Provide a chance for all participants to practice the skills they have learned.

Recommended schedule for the Training

This is a 5-day training program designed to provide information that is needed for counsellors to provide effective nutrition counselling, care and support for PLHIV in Cambodia.
Recommended schedule for the training is provided below.

  • DAY 1: Lessons 1, 2, and 3
  • DAY 2: Lessons 3 and 4
  • DAY 3: Lesson 5
  • DAY 4: Lesson 6 and prepare for Supervised Field Practice
  • DAY 5: Supervised Field Practice (morning), with debriefing and Certificate Ceremony (afternoon).

Please allow adequate time in the training to cover ALL of the material. Do not try to rush. If it is not possible to have training for 5 consecutive days, consider breaking it into three- and two-day sessions. The details of the training schedule are shown below.

DAY 1

Time

Duration (minutes)

Topic

8.00 – 8.40

40

Opening Session (formal opening, overview, ice breaker)

8.40 – 9.00

20

Pre-test

9.00 – 9.30

30

Lesson 1: Introduction to the Good Food Toolkit – Purpose of the Toolkit

9.30 – 9.45

15

Break

9.45 – 10.00

15

Lesson 1: Introduction to the Good Food Toolkit – Target groups & primary target for nutrition counseling

10.00 – 10.15

15

Lesson 1: Introduction to the Good Food Toolkit – Contents of the Toolkit

10.15 – 10.30

15

Lesson 2: Nutrition Basics – Basic nutrition terms

10.30 – 11.30

60

Lesson 2: Nutrition Basics – Three food groups

11.30 – 13.30

120

Lunch Break

13.30 – 14.00

30

Lesson 2: Nutrition Basics – Energy requirements

14.00 – 15.00

60

Lesson 2: Nutrition Basics – Nutrition throughout the lifecycle

15.00 – 15.15

15

Break

15.15 – 16.00

45

Lesson 2: Nutrition Basics – Nutrition throughout the lifecycle

16.00 – 16.30

30

Lesson 3: Nutrition and HIV – Relationship between HIV and nutrition

16.30 – 17.00

30

Conclusion of the day and daily training evaluation

17.00

End

DAY 2

Time

Duration (minutes)

Topic

8.00 – 8.15

15

Recap Day 1

8.15 – 8.45

30

Lesson 3: Nutrition and HIV – Energy requirements and percentage increase for PLHIV

8.45 – 9.30

45

Lesson 3: Nutrition and HIV – Cycle of HIV, poor nutrition and infection

9.30 – 9.45

15

Break

9.45 – 10.30

45

Lesson 3: Nutrition and HIV – Some common misinformation about nutrition for PLHIV

10.30 – 11.30

60

Lesson 4: Anthropometry – Assessment for malnutrition in adults

11.30 – 13.30

120

Lunch Break

13.30 – 15.00

90

Lesson 4: Anthropometry – Assessment for malnutrition in children

15.00 – 15.15

15

Break

15.15 – 16.30

75

Lesson 4: Anthropometry – Assessment for malnutrition in children

16.30 – 17.00

30

Conclusion of the day and daily training evaluation

17.00

End

DAY 3

Time

Duration (minutes)

Topic

8.00 – 8.15

15

Recap Day 2

8.15 – 9.30

75

Lesson 5: How to use the Good Food Toolkit – Five steps for nutrition counseling

9.30 – 9.45

15

Break

9.45 – 11.00

75

Lesson 5: How to use the Good Food Toolkit – Using small food cards

11.00 – 11.30

30

Lesson 5: How to use the Good Food Toolkit – Using large food cards

11.30 – 13.30

120

Lunch Break

13.30 – 13.40

10

Energizer

13.40 – 15.00

80

Lesson 5: How to use the Good Food Toolkit – Filling out monitoring forms

15.00 – 15.15

15

Break

15.15 – 16.30

75

Lesson 5: How to use the Good Food Toolkit – Filling out monitoring forms

16.30 – 17.00

30

Conclusion of the day and daily training evaluation

17.00

End

DAY 4

Time

Duration (minutes)

Topic

08.00 – 08.15

15

Recap Day 3

08.15 – 9.30

75

Lesson 6: Positive Living for PLHIV – Positive Living Cards

9.30 – 9.45

15

Break

9.45 – 11.30

105

Lesson 6: Positive Living for PLHIV – Positive Living Cards

11.30 – 13.30

120

Lunch Break

13.30 – 13.40

10

Energizer

13.40 – 15.00

80

Lesson 6: Positive Living for PLHIV – Introduction to communication skills

15.00 – 15.15

15

Break

15.15 – 16.15

60

Supervised Field Practice preparation

16.15 – 16.35

20

Post-test

16.35 – 17.00

25

Conclusion of the day

17.00

End

DAY 5

Time

Duration (minutes)

Topic

08.00 – 11.30

210

Supervised Field Practice

11.30 – 13.30

120

Lunch Break

13.30 – 14.30

60

Debriefing

14.30 – 15.00

30

Final Training and Field Practice Evaluation

15.00 – 15.15

15

Break

15.15 – 16.00

45

Certificate Ceremony

16.00 – 17.00

60

Conclusion and closing

17.00

End

Training the Trainers (TOT)

This training module should be used for all levels of training, including the TOT. The methods and activities used in this training are designed for individuals working at lower level health facilities, at the community level and in the homes of PLHIV. Therefore, most of the activities involve participatory learning by hearing, seeing, and doing through short lectures and discussions, photos, demonstrations, games, role-play, and practice exercises.

For the TOT, it is recommended that it take place in two phases: in the first phase, participants receive the entire 5-day training. The same training activities should be applied for those who will eventually be responsible to become trainers. The TOT must allow the participants to apply and practice what they have learned from the 5-day training. It is recommended that the participants complete at least 6 months of post training practice before undertaking the cascade training.

In the second phase, the participants will receive further training to ensure that future trainers are skilled and confident in their abilities to train others and serve as informed resources for them. This level of training provides opportunities for the future trainers to practice delivering the training to each other, applying what they have learned however this time acting as “trainers” to each other.

LESSON 1 – INTRODUCTION TO THE “GOOD FOOD TOOLKIT”

Learning objectives

At the end of this session, participants will be able to describe:

  1. the purpose of the Toolkit
  2. the correct target group for nutrition counselling using the Toolkit
  3. the main components of the Good Food Toolkit

Content

  • Background to the Good Food Toolkit
  • Purpose and use of the Toolkit
  • Target audience for the Toolkit
  • Contents of the Toolkit

Methods

  • Brainstorming
  • Demonstration
  • Group Discussion
  • Participatory Lecture

Materials

  • “Good Food Toolkit”
  • Large paper or white board
  • Markers
  • Coloured sticky notes
  • Copy of:
    • “Self-Care Series” booklets (FHI)
    • Nutrition and HIV training manual (KHANA)
    • Complementary Feeding for Children aged 6-23 months booklet (FAO)
    • Baby Friendly Community Initiative Flipchart (National Nutrition Program/NNP)
    • Cooking Demonstration Manual

Duration: 1 hour

Evaluation: Quiz

LESSON 2 – NUTRITION BASICS

Learning objectives

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. define basic nutrition terms
  2. name and provide examples of the three food groups and the role of each group in the body
  3. describe what energy is, and describe the general energy requirements for different people
  4. identify the changing nutritional needs across the lifecycle

Content

  • Basic nutrition terms
  • Three food groups
  • Energy and calories
  • Nutrition through the life cycle and in the context of HIV
  • Infant feeding

Methods

  • Participatory Lecture
  • Brainstorming
  • Group discussion
  • Game

Materials

  • “Good Food Toolkit”
  • Helen Keller International (HKI)/NNP poster of three food groups
  • Large paper or white board
  • Markers
  • Small ball
  • Pictures of rice from the Toolkit
  • Picture of tall and short rice plants
  • Tape/blue tack

Duration: 3.5 hours

Evaluation: Quiz

LESSON 3 – NUTRITION AND HIV

Learning objectives

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. understand the relationship between HIV and nutrition
  2. describe the cycle of HIV, poor nutrition and infection
  3. discuss challenges to good nutrition
  4. discuss seven ways to gain or maintain a healthy weight (adults and children) or to maintain good growth (children)
  5. identify incorrect myths about HIV and food and provide the correct information to counter those myths

Content

  • Relationship between nutrition and HIV
  • Increased energy needs
  • Cycle of HIV, poor nutrition and infection
  • Benefits of and challenges to good nutrition
  • ART and nutrition
  • Weight loss in PLHIV
  • Incorrect myths about HIV and food

Methods

  • Participatory Lecture
  • Brainstorming
  • Demonstration
  • Game
  • Small Group Discussion
  • Plenary Group Discussion

Materials

  • Lesson 3 Learning Objectives written on large paper
  • Large paper, Small paper
  • Purple “enhancer” cards from the Toolkit
  • Soup pictures from the Toolkit and Training Manual
  • Rice pictures from the Toolkit
  • Tape and markers

Duration: 2.5 hour

Evaluation: Quiz

LESSON 4 – ANTHROPOMETRY

Learning objectives

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. name three ways of assessing nutritional status of adult men, women and children
  2. accurately measure and record the height and weight of an adult
  3. calculate Body Mass Index (BMI) using an adult’s weight and height
  4. accurately measure, record and interpret the Mid Upper Arm Circumference (MUAC) of an adult (pregnant or within 6 months post-partum) and a child 6-59 months of age
  5. accurately measure and interpret the length, height and weight in children aged 6-59 months of age, and BMI-for age in children and adolescents 5- 19 years of age

Content

  • Why do we measure nutritional status?
  • Malnutrition in PLHIV
  • Ways to identify malnutrition risk in PLHIV
  • Measurements in adults
  • Measurements in children and adolescents

Methods

  • Participatory Lecture
  • Demonstration
  • Practice

Materials

  • Lesson 4 Learning Objectives written on large paper
  • Tape measure (cm) (1 per small group)
  • Strong tape
  • Hard-cover book, clip board, or rectangular board of wood of about the same size (1 per small group)
  • Large paper
  • Pen or fine-tip marker
  • Sample weight charts from OI/ART clinic
  • Body Mass Index (BMI) table (1 per participant)
  • BMI Look-up Table for determining BMI for children and adolescents
  • Calculator
  • MUAC for children aged 6-59 months
  • MUAC tape for adults
  • Height/length board
  • Uniscale (standalone scale)
  • Infant scale
  • World Health Organization (WHO) Health Records
  • Felt pen/biro/pen
  • Toy baby for practicing measurements or members of the community who are available to have measurements taken for practice (if appropriate)

Duration: 3hours 45 minutes

Evaluation: Quiz

LESSON 5 – HOW TO USE THE “GOOD FOOD TOOLKIT”

Learning objectives

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. perform the five steps for nutrition counselling
  2. able to complete the Toolkit monitoring forms

Content

  • Contents of the Good Food Toolkit
  • Five steps for nutrition counselling
  • Translating theory into practice: role play

Methods

  • Review
  • Participatory Lecture
  • Demonstration
  • Practice

Materials

  • Nutrition Counselling Monitoring Forms (3 per participant)
  • Lesson 5 Learning Objectives written on large paper or white board
  • Monitoring Forms written on 2 large pieces of paper, white board or on LCD projector
  • Good Food Toolkit (1 per participant)
  • Steps to Nutrition Counselling written on large paper or white board
  • Star cut-out
  • Markers
  • Tape

Duration: 5 hours 35 minutes

Evaluation: Quiz

LESSON 6 – POSITIVE LIVING FOR PLHIV

Learning objectives

At the end of this session, participants will be able to:

  1. describe the importance of each of the Positive Living Behaviours for maintaining or achieving good nutrition and good health
  2. describe practical dietary and other strategies to manage symptoms of HIV
  3. understand what good communication skills are and how these relate to counselling
  4. use the Positive Living cards to counsel PLHIV about the problems that they have, and how to live well to prevent illness
  5. decide which Positive Living cards are appropriate for a counselling session, depending on the circumstances of PLHIV

Content

  • Living positively with PLHIV
  • Managing HIV-related symptoms through diet and other strategies
  • Counselling PLHIV on positive living
  • Good communication skills

Methods

  • Presentation of cards
  • Participatory Lecture
  • Discussion
  • Game
  • Demonstration
  • Role Play

Materials

  • Large paper and markers
  • Large paper Monitoring Form (same as in Lesson 5)
  • Paper and pen/pencil for each participant
  • Blank A4 papers
  • Large paper or white board
  • Bag of beans (at least 15 beans per participant)
  • Prize(s) for the winner(s) of the game (Learning objective 5), if it is possible to conduct a hand washing demonstration:
    • Clean water (or cistern with scoop)
    • Soap and/or ash

Duration: 4 hours 20 minutes

Evaluation: Quiz

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